Monthly Archives: February 2018

World Book Day

Hi everyone,

As you are aware today is ‘World Book Day’ and I would love to find out what you enjoy reading. This can be a short blog about the book, why it’s enjoyable, who are some of the characters? What is the plot?…..ssshhh don’t give too much away!

My favourite book is ‘Cosmic’ by Frank Cottrell Boyce. A young boy called Liam explains, via flashbacks, not only how he comes to be lost in outer space with a bunch of other children, but why one of those kids calls him “Dad”, which makes for quite the delightful and riveting read. Liam, who associates skills he learns playing World of Warcraft to real-life challenges, is unusually tall for a 12-year-old and is sprouting whiskers. Given the fact that he is not at all averse to lying about his age, he has enjoyed situations where grown-ups believe he, too, is an adult.

It’s definitely a must read!!!!!

Happy Blogging!

Mr Carr

 

The Man Who Walked Between The Towers

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As part of our context for learning looking at ‘The Man Who Walked Between the Two Towers’, the children replicated some of the movements of the famous French aerobatic Philippe Petit.  They took part in activities such as: juggling in pairs, javelin throwing, balancing on boxes and tight rope walking. Overall, the children have really immersed themselves into the story and are now working towards writing a flashback about Philippe Petit’s day walking across the towers.

Maths Support Spring 2 Week 2

Next week the children will be focussing on geometry. They will be identifying 3D shapes, including cubes and other cuboids, from 2D representations. The children will also use the properties of rectangles to deduce related facts & find missing lengths & angles.

Nets of 3D shapes

The net of a 3D shape is what it looks like if it is opened out flat. A net can be folded up to make a 3D shape.

There may be several possible nets for one 3D shape.

Here are some examples:

Net of a cube Net of a cube

Net of a cuboid Net of a cuboid

Net of a square-based pyramid Net of a square-based pyramid

Net of a triangle-based pyramid Net of a tetrahedron

3D shapes

3D shapes have faces (sides), edges and vertices (corners).

The exception is the sphere which has no edges or vertices.

3D shapes

 

Spring 2 Week 1 Maths Support

The first week back after the holidays, the children will be looking at multiplying and dividing numbers. In particular, the children will multiply and divide whole numbers and those involving decimals by 10, 100 and 1000.

Multiplying by 10, 100 or 1000

When you multiply by 10, move all the digits one place to the left, putting a zero in the empty space.

246 x 10 = 2460

Example 246 multiplied by 10

When you multiply by 100, move all the digits two places to the left, putting a zero in the empty spaces.

When you multiply by 1000, move all the digits three places to the left, putting a zero in the empty spaces.

The decimal point always stays in the same place.

Dividing by 10, 100 or 1000

When you divide by 10, move all the digits one place to the right (the opposite way to multiplying).

246 ÷ 10 = 24.6

Example 246 divided by 10

When you divide by 100, move all the digits two places to the right.

When you divide by 1000, move all the digits three places to the right.

The decimal point always stays in the same place

Maths Support Week 6

For the final week of the half term, the children will be focussing on geometry. They will distinguish between regular and irregular polygons based on reasoning about equal sides and angles.

Polygons

Polygons are shapes with many straight sides:

  • Regular polygons have equal angles and sides of equal length.
  • Irregular polygons have sides of different lengths.

Here are some common polygons:

Pentagons have 5 sides:

A regular pentagon

A regular pentagon

 

Hexagons have 6 sides:

A regular hexagon

A regular hexagon

 

Heptagons have 7 sides:

A regular heptagon

A regular heptagon

 

Octagons have 8 sides:

A regular Octagon

A regular octagon